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March 2018 Archives

Hospital accused of leaving needle in woman's spine

A Florida naval hospital is facing accusations that it left part of a needle in a woman's spine when she had a caesarean section there in 2003. The woman now lives in Texas, but at the time, her husband was stationed with the Navy in Jacksonville. She had her third son at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and has suffered from pain ever since.

Wrong diagnosis can be preamble to medical malpractice

When a patient in Florida faces a medical malpractice situation, there is a good chance that the problems started at the diagnostic level. According to a report published in March 2018 by a malpractice insurance provider, a third of the medical wrongdoing claims brought by patients between 2013 and 2017 were related to misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis cases.

Common factors in medication errors

Even with advances in digital record-keeping technology, healthcare professionals are liable to make mistakes that in turn lead to medication errors. Medication errors account for more than 250,000 deaths in Florida and the rest of the U.S., according to a 2016 study from Johns Hopkins University, so it's important that nurses and other professionals know what factors often contribute to these errors.

Weeding out cases of cellulitis misdiagnosis

Doctors in Florida see many patients with skin inflammation and other symptoms of skin disorders. One skin infection, cellulitis, is common, but there is no reliable tool for diagnosing it. Because its symptoms are similar to those of other skin conditions, many cellulitis diagnoses are false. Now researchers have found that involving a dermatologist in the diagnosis of cellulitis at an early stage can catch misdiagnoses and prevent unnecessary treatment.

New study determines diabetes subcategories

A study that was published in March may change how diabetes patients in Florida, and the doctors who treat them, think about the condition. The authors of the study claim that rather than dividing the condition into type 1 and type 2, having a total of five subcategories could pave the way for earlier diabetes detection and treatment.