Losing weight can reduce risk for breast cancer, study says

A study published in the journal Cancer has clarified the link that exists between one’s weight and one’s risk for breast cancer. One third of postmenopausal women in Florida and across the U.S. are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, so the results of the study have a wide applicability.

Though the risk for breast cancer rises as women age, they may be able to reduce that risk by losing weight. After analyzing more than 60,000 women, researchers found that those who lost 5 percent of body weight over a three-year period saw a 12 percent statistically significant decrease in breast cancer incidences.

Obesity can result in various body signals that stimulate the growth of breast cancer. The link between it and breast cancer had been established previously, but this study finally addresses whether or not losing weight could affect one’s risk. It is to be hoped that more postmenopausal women are empowered to lose weight because of the results of the study.

Researchers did not associate weight gain of more than 5 percent with breast cancer risk in general. However, women who gained weight did have an increased risk for a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer called triple-negative breast cancer.

Those who develop breast cancer and were the victims of medical negligence should know that they might be compensated for their losses. Filing a medical malpractice claim usually requires legal assistance, so victims may want to hire a lawyer. The lawyer may be able to request an inquiry with the local medical board and have third parties conduct an independent investigation.

Perhaps the doctor misdiagnosed a malign tumor or failed to order a mammogram, X-ray, biopsy or other essential test. Whatever the situation, the lawyer may negotiate on the victim’s behalf for a fair settlement. If negotiations fail, victims might choose to litigate.